12/4/2021»»Saturday

El Capitan Usb Creator

12/4/2021

To create a bootable USB fo Mac OS X El Capitan you need to be able to convert the

InstallMacOSX.pkg to the Install OS X El Capitan.app, this can only be done on macs

Create El Capitan Bootable Usb From Windows Xp It does not matter whether you use macOS or Windows 10. It’s just a matter of time until your device will refuse to start, which could happen for many reasons, including (and not limited to) file corruption, hardware failure, and buggy update. When the OS X El Capitan and Unibeast downloaded, open Disk Utility and click Erase then enter a. Create a bootable USB drive for macOS X versions including El Capitan, Yosemite, Mavericks, Sierra, High Sierra, Mojave, Catalina and Big Sur. Create Bootable USB for Mac OS X El Capitan with TransMac. A new pop up box will appear, click on the three-dots, and then select the macOS X El Capitan.DMG file from Windows. Then click on OK. Choose Mac OSX El Capitan DMG file. Since the file is huge so it will take quite time to complete. It may take about 20 to 30 mins or more.

that are capable or running El Capitan, this includes macs that have been upgraded to later OS's.

But crucially does not include macs that came preinstalled from new with a new OS.

Macs cannot run an older OS than the one they came preinstalled with.

Unfortunately Apple have not taken in to consideration that users may just want to create bootable

installers for older macs and not actually install the OS.

The mac you tried with that is running Catalina must have come with an OS newer than El Capitan pre-installed.


When you tried to download High Sierra even though you got the warning about it being an older OS than the

one you have installed did it not give you the chance to Download Anyway.


There is a workaround for the El Capitan problem if you are willing to try, read about it here.

https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/379603/how-do-i-create-el-capitan-installer-on-a-catalina-or-post-el-capitan-installeI have not tried this for myself, but have linked other people to this article who faced the same situation, they reported back with positive results.


Mar 13, 2021 9:45 AM

It was 2009 when Apple last released a new operating system on physical media. Things have proceeded remarkably smoothly since version 10.7 switched to download-only installers, but there are still good reasons to want an old, reliable USB stick. For instance, if you find yourself doing multiple installs, a USB drive may be faster than multiple downloads (especially if you use a USB 3.0 drive). Or maybe you need a recovery disk for older Macs that don't support the Internet Recovery feature. Whatever the reason, you're in luck, because it's not hard to make one.

As with last year, there are two ways to get it done. There's the super easy way with the graphical user interface and the only slightly less easy way that requires some light Terminal use. Here's what you need to get started.

  • A Mac that you have administrator access to, duh. We've created El Capitan USB stick from both Yosemite and El Capitan, but your experience with other versions may vary.
  • An 8GB or larger USB flash drive or an 8GB or larger partition on some other kind of external drive. For newer Macs, use a USB 3.0 drive—it makes things significantly faster.
  • The OS X 10.11 El Capitan installer from the Mac App Store in your Applications folder. The installer will delete itself when you install the operating system, but it can be re-downloaded if necessary.
  • If you want a GUI, you need the latest version of Diskmaker X app. Version 5 is the one with official El Capitan support.
  • Diskmaker X is free to download, but the creator accepts donations if you want to support his efforts.

The easy way

Once you've obtained all of the necessary materials, connect the USB drive to your Mac and run the Diskmaker X app. The app will offer to make installers for OS X 10.9, 10.10, and 10.11, and it should run on OS X versions all the way back to 10.7—support for 10.6 was dropped in the most recent release.

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Diskmaker X has actually been around since the days of OS X 10.7 (it was previously known as Lion Diskmaker), and it's still the easiest GUI-based way to go without intimidating newbies. If you're comfortable with the command line, it's still possible to create a disk manually using a Terminal command, which we'll cover momentarily.

Select OS X 10.11 in Diskmaker X, and the app should automatically find the copy you've downloaded to your Applications folder. It will then ask you where you want to copy the files—click 'An 8GB USB thumb drive' if you have a single drive to use or 'Another kind of disk' to use a partition on a larger drive or some other kind of external drive. Choose your disk (or partition) from the list that appears, verify that you'd like to have the disk (or partition) erased, and then wait for the files to copy over. The process is outlined in screenshots above.

El Capitan Usb Creator Key

The only slightly less-easy way

If you don't want to use Diskmaker X, Apple has actually included a terminal command that can create an install disk for you. Assuming that you have the OS X El Capitan installer in your Applications folder and you have a Mac OS X Extended (Journaled)-formatted USB drive named 'Untitled' mounted on the system, you can create an El Capitan install drive by typing the following command into the Terminal.

El Capitan Usb Creator

sudo /Applications/Install OS X El Capitan.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/Untitled --applicationpath /Applications/Install OS X El Capitan.app --nointeraction

El Capitan Usb Creator

The command will erase the disk and copy the install files over. Give it some time, and your volume will soon be loaded up with not just the OS X installer but also an external recovery partition that may come in handy if your hard drive dies and you're away from an Internet connection.

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Whichever method you use, you should be able to boot from your new USB drive either by changing the default Startup Disk in System Preferences or by holding down the Option key at boot and selecting the drive. Once booted, you'll be able to install or upgrade El Capitan as you normally would.

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